How to Gauge Your Ears

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Ear gauges are a bold and stylish way to express your individuality. If you’ve always wanted to gauge your ears, you can do so from the comfort of your home. Just get your ears pierced at a local studio, then use professional tools like tapers and surgical tape to stretch the holes out over time. As long as you have patience and practice good hygiene, you can gauge your ears safely.

EditSteps

EditInserting Your First Gauge into Your Ear

  1. Get your ears pierced at a trustworthy location. Although you can gauge your ears at home, you will need to get them pierced at a professional establishment. Piercing your ears at home increases your risk of infection, especially if you are gauging your ears afterward. You will be unable to use the same sterile equipment and technique as a licensed professional.
    Gauge Your Ears Step 1 Version 4.jpg
  2. Wait 6-10 weeks after piercing your ears to gauge them. Piercings must be fully healed before it is safe to gauge. If you do not want to wait the full ten weeks, watch for signs of healing. A healed ear piercing will not be tender to the touch and will not close if the piercing is removed for longer than several hours.[1]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 2 Version 4.jpg
    • Do not gauge your ears if your piercing is infected. Signs of infection include swelling, yellow or greenish discharge, redness, irritation, and bleeding.[2]
  3. Begin stretching your ear with a size 16-20 gauge. Ears are typically pierced using an 18 or 20 gauge, so 16 is the largest gauge you can start on and avoid damaging your ears. Starting at any larger than this size puts your ear at-risk of tearing.[3]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 3 Version 4.jpg
  4. Purchase a set of ear tapers at a piercing studio. Many piercing studios offer a “stretching kit” of ear tapers in various sizes. Start with your size 16-20 ear taper, depending on your chosen gauge. Make sure that the stretching kit has your starting taper size before you purchase it.[4]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 4 Version 2.jpg
  5. Massage an oil lubricant around your piercing. The lubricant will help the taper slide into your piercing easily and without tearing your ear. Coconut oil or jojoba oil works especially well for gauging ears. Avoid using petroleum oil, which can get clogged in your piercing and cause infections.[5]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 5 Version 4.jpg
    • Wash your hands before you massage the lubricant into your ears.
  6. Push your taper through your piercing. Most piercing tapers are smaller at one end. Push the smaller end into your piercing, paying attention to how your ear feels as you do so. Work slowly, and stop pushing the taper in if you feel any strong resistance.[6]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 6 Version 4.jpg
    • Pushing the taper in may hurt but should not bleed. If your ear begins to bleed, you may have chosen too large of a taper. Remove the taper, treat and disinfect the wound, and wait until the wound has healed before inserting a smaller taper later on. When your ear has stopped bleeding, place the earring back in to prevent the hole from closing up.
  7. Replace the taper with your gauge. Align your jewelry with the large end of the taper, and finish pushing the taper through your ear until you reach the gauge. Push the gauge in through the temporary hole that the taper leaves. Repeat this process with the other ear if desired.[7]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 7 Version 4.jpg
    • Once you have inserted the taper into your piercing, it can be replaced immediately with the gauge.
    • Tapers are not designed to be worn as jewelry. Do not wear your tapers for any longer than several hours.

EditStretching Your Ear Further

  1. Wait six weeks in between stretches. Do not remove your first gauge for at least a week after stretching, and only remove it for the first month while cleaning your gauges. Give your earlobes at least six weeks before stretching your ear with a taper or other method so your earlobes have time to heal.[8]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 8 Version 4.jpg
  2. Use surgical tape to gradually increase the gauge over time. After you’ve used 3 or 4 tapers to stretch your piercing, you can use the taping method to continue increasing your gauge size. Wrap your gauge with a thin layer of surgical tape and place it back in your ear.[9]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 9 Version 2.jpg
    • Try this method if you have run out of tapers and d not want to purchase more.
    • Increase the layers of tape around your ear gauge every six weeks so your ear has time to heal.
  3. Use ear weights to stretch your piercing in a short amount of time. Weighted gauges can stretch your ears quickly but usually do so at an uneven pace. Use ear weights for short-term stretching, but never wear them overnight. Replace them with unweighted gauges after several hours to avoid damaging your ear.
    Gauge Your Ears Step 10 Version 2.jpg
  4. Try tapered claws to painlessly stretch your gauge. Tapered claws or talons are used to slowly push through your piercing, much like regular tapers, but are created to be worn as jewelry. Tapered claws are usually the easiest and least painful method of stretching because they involve less inserting and removing.[10]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 11 Version 2.jpg

EditCaring for Gauged Ears

  1. Clean your ears with antibacterial soap twice a day. Wash your hands before touching your ears to prevent infection. Apply antibacterial cream around the rim of your piercing to further prevent infection. Any more than two times a day can irritate your piercing.[11]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 12.jpg
    • Use a cotton swab to remove any dried skin or crust around your piercing.
  2. Massage your earlobe for five minutes every day. Massage your ear once or twice a day, preferably right after you have washed your ear. This will help your ear heal and accommodate to its new stretched size. Apply jojoba or vitamin-E oil as you massage your ears to keep your piercing soft and stretchy.[12]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 13.jpg
  3. Remove your gauge for cleaning after a week. To prevent your piercing from smelling bad or getting infected, remove your gauge a week after you last stretched your ear and wash it with an antibacterial soap. Rinse the gauge before inserting it back in your ear. While your ear gauge is out, rub some jojoba or vitamin-E oil in and around your piercing.[13]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 14.jpg
    • Once you are finished stretching your ears and six weeks have passed since your last stretching session, you can insert and remove your gauges as you please without risking shrinkage.
  4. Watch for signs of infection. Redness, swelling, and green or yellow discharge are the most common signs of infection. Not all of these signs necessarily mean your ears are infected: you may just have minor ear irritation. But if you notice two or more infection symptoms, visit a piercer or medical professional for treatment.[14]
    Gauge Your Ears Step 15.jpg
    • See a doctor immediately if you notice any severe infection symptoms, such as thick, bad smelling discharge; red streaks coming from your piercing; fever or chills; nausea; dizziness or disorientation; or any minor infection symptoms for more than a week.
    • If you notice any signs of infection, check your lymph nodes. Swollen lymph nodes are another sign of infection.

EditTips

  • Ask your parent or guardian before gauging your ears.
  • Make sure you purchase gauges and stretching materials from a professional source so you can trust them.
  • Check your school or work dress codes before gauging your ears so you can plan accordingly.

EditWarnings

  • Never put everyday objects (like pencils) through your gauge holes. The bacteria on these objects can cause infections.
  • Do not submerge your ear in water while it is healing in-between stretches. Wear a swim cap while visiting pools or bathing.
  • Do not skip sizes when stretching with tapers. Skipping sizes puts you at a greater risk for tearing and infections.
  • Once you have stretched your ears with a gauge, it is difficult to shrink your piercing holes without surgery. Do not gauge your ears unless you are positive that you want this look for the long-term.[15]

EditThings You’ll Need

  • Ear gauge
  • An ear taper set
  • Jojoba, coconut, or vitamin-E oil
  • Surgical tape
  • Antibacterial soap

EditRelated wikiHows

EditSources and Citations

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How to Sew Patches

You can sew patches to cover up a hole, or as an embellishment on a fabric item. There are several things you can do to ensure that your patches serve their purpose and look good, such as sizing the patch material, securing the patch in place before sewing, and using the right type of stitch to secure your patch in place. Try sewing on your own patches the next time you need to cover up a hole or embellish something.

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EditSteps

EditSewing a Patch to Cover a Hole

  1. Get a patch that matches the fabric. It is important to make sure that your patch matches the fabric in your item. Otherwise, it will stand out from the rest of the material. Look for a patch that matches the fabric of your item as closely as possible.
    Sew Patches Step 1.jpg
    • If you do not want to buy a patch, then you can also use a scrap of fabric. Visit a local craft store to find fabric that matches your item, or visit a thrift shop and find something that you can cut up. You can even cut a scrap of fabric off of an old item that you no longer need or want.
  2. Snip away any frayed edges. Frayed edges will get in the way when you are trying to sew the patch in place. They will also cause the patch to stand out more. Use a pair of scissors to snip away any frayed edges on your item. Try to make the edges of the hole as even as possible.[1]
    Sew Patches Step 2.jpg
  3. Cut the patch as needed. You may need to cut your patch material down a bit depending on the size of the hole. Cut the patch so that it is large enough to cover the hole and any weakened areas of the item.[2]
    Sew Patches Step 3.jpg
    • The patch should extend beyond the borders of the hole on all sides by about 1” (2.5 cm).
    • Cut the patch so that it is the same shape as the hole as well. For example, if the hole is rectangular, then cut the patch into a similar rectangle.
  4. Turn the item inside out. The item needs to be inside out when you sew on the patch so that the edges of the patch will be hidden. Turn your item inside out.[3]
    Sew Patches Step 4.jpg
  5. Pin the patch in place. Next, identify where the patch needs to go and lay it over the hole. Make sure that all of the edges are completely covering the hole and that the front side of the patch is facing down. Insert pins through the patch and item fabric along each of the edges to secure the patch in place.
    Sew Patches Step 5.jpg
    • If your patch has fusing on the back of it, then you may want to iron the patch to secure it in place until you sew it. Apply even pressure to the edges of the patch to secure the patch to the fabric. Do not use steam.
    • You can also use some adhesive, such as fabric glue, or double-sided tape to hold the patch in place until you are ready to sew.
  6. Thread your sewing machine or needle. You can either use a sewing machine or hand sew your patch in place. Thread your sewing machine or needle with a thread that matches or will blend in with your fabric.
    Sew Patches Step 6.jpg
    • If you cannot find an exact match for your fabric, then try using invisible thread.
    • Depending on the thickness of your patch and item, you may want to use a heavy duty needle in your sewing machine or for hand sewing.[4] For example, if you are sewing a denim patch onto a pair of jeans, then a heavy duty needle will work best. You may also need to adjust the stitch length.
  7. Sew around the edges of the patch to secure it. Use a straight stitch on your sewing machine or sew a straight stitch by hand using a needle and thread. Sew about ½” (1.3 cm) from the raw edge of the patch to ensure that it is going through the fabric of your item. Sew around the edges of the patch three times to ensure that it is secure.[5]
    Sew Patches Step 7.jpg
    • Remove the pins as you sew. Sewing over a pin may damage the needle and possibly even damage the machine.
    • Trim the excess threads when you are finished.

EditSewing a Decorative Patch onto an Item

  1. Determine where you want to place the patch. When you are sewing a patch onto the outside of an item, it is very important to consider the placement. You may need to have the patch in a specific place, such as for a scout badge on a sash or a patch on a nurse’s lab coat. Or, if you are using a patch to embellish an item, then the placement of your patch may affect the look of your item. Identify where you want or need the patch to go before you sew.[6]
    Sew Patches Step 8.jpg
    • Make sure the item is right side out.
  2. Pin the patch onto the item. When you feel confident about the placement of your patch, pin it in place to mark the position. Use 2 or more straight pins to secure the patch to the fabric. Insert the pins near the center of the patch so they will not get in the way when you sew.[7]
    Sew Patches Step 9.jpg
    • If desired, you can also use a small amount of washable glue, such as Elmer’s school glue, to help keep the patch in place while you sew.[8]
  3. Install a new heavy duty needle in your sewing machine. Patches that go on the outside of items are typically thick, so using a heavy duty needle will make sewing the patch in place much easier. Install a heavy duty needle in your sewing machine, such as a 90/14 universal needle.[9]
    Sew Patches Step 10.jpg
    • If you are sewing by hand, then you should also use a heavy duty needle.
  4. Set your machine to a narrow zigzag stitch setting. A narrow zigzag setting works best for sewing patches onto items. This will ensure that the stitches go over the edges of the patch and through the patch as well. Set your machine to the zigzag stitch setting, and then reduce the stitch length and width to the narrowest possible size for your machine.[10]
    Sew Patches Step 11.jpg
  5. Sew around the edges of your patch. Raise your presser foot and needle and then line up the edge of your patch with the needle. Lower the presser foot and begin sewing around the edges of the patch. Go slowly to ensure that you only stitch along the edges of the patch. The zigzag stitch should overlap the edges of the patch and go into the fabric of your item right next to the patch.[11]
    Sew Patches Step 12.jpg
    • You may also sew the patch in place by hand using a whipstitch if desired. However, this will take longer and the patch may not be attached as securely to your item. Using a sewing machine will be much quicker and the results will probably look better.

EditThings You’ll Need

  • Patch or patch material
  • Pins
  • Scissors
  • Adhesive, double sided tape, or an iron (optional)
  • Sewing machine or needle and thread
  • Heavy duty needle for your sewing machine or for hand sewing

EditSources and Citations

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How to Do Tile Painting

Many people believe that the only way to color a tile is to glaze it in a kiln, but you can actually paint tile yourself at home! If you do the right prep work, it’s a quick, easy task that will let you re-color your flooring or bathroom, or even add a decorative element to your floors, counters, or mantel. Learning how to choose the right supplies, prepare your tile for painting, and paint and seal your tile correctly will help you re-do your home quickly and inexpensively.

EditSteps

EditGathering Materials

  1. Purchase ceramic, epoxy, enamel, or latex paint. Using the right paint is very important. Water-based paint like acrylic, watercolors, or spray paint will not work at all, especially if you’re painting bathroom or kitchen tile. You can use commercial tile or ceramic paint, oil-based paint, colored epoxy, enamel, or latex paint.[1]
    Do Tile Painting Step 1 Version 2.jpg
  2. Choose the best brushes for your project. If you are painting an intricate scene or design on your tile, you’ll most likely need several different sizes of brushes. If you are painting a large bathroom wall, for example, you can use a larger brush.[2]
    Do Tile Painting Step 2 Version 2.jpg
  3. Set up your supplies and protect your work area. Lay out cleaning supplies, sandpaper, and protective gear. You’ll need to take a few precautions to prevent injury or paint spills in your work area.[3]
    Do Tile Painting Step 3 Version 2.jpg
    • Lay a tarp down on the floor to prevent paint from dripping on it.
    • Line the edges of your work area with painter’s tape.
    • Keep damp rags nearby in case you need to fix any mistakes.
    • Open windows or bring a fan into the room for ventilation.
    • Wear a painter’s mask to avoid inhaling fumes.
    • If you’re working in the kitchen, move food to another area to prevent contamination.

EditPrepping Your Tile

  1. Clean the tile with degreaser and tile cleaner. If your tile is brand new, you can just wipe off the surface. Older tile, especially flooring or bathroom tile, will need to be cleaned thoroughly. Start by using a degreaser, then wash the tile with tile cleaner or soap and water. It’s very important that your tile is perfectly clean, so don’t skip this step![4]
    Do Tile Painting Step 4 Version 2.jpg
    • Use bleach or hydrogen peroxide to remove any mold.
    • Vinegar works well for removing soap scum and shower residue.
  2. Sand your tile with 1800-grit paper until it’s no longer smooth. You won’t need to sand unglazed tile, but any ceramic that has already been glazed will need to be sanded to provide a rough surface for the paint to adhere to. Use 1800-grit sandpaper to smooth the tile and remove uneven gloss.[5]
    Do Tile Painting Step 5 Version 2.jpg
  3. Wipe off the dust with a damp rag. Sanding creates a lot of dust, and it will affect the look of your paint. Make sure all of the dust from sanding is gone by wiping the entire surface with a damp cloth. You can also vacuum away any accumulated dust.[6]
    Do Tile Painting Step 6 Version 2.jpg
  4. Apply an oil-based high adhesion primer to home surfaces. Oil primers are efficient at preventing stains and holding on to ceramic and/or oil-based paint, but you won’t need to use them for decorative art tiles that won’t be walked on or used. If you’re planning to paint in a high-traffic area, like the shower or the hallway floor, use two coats.[7]
    Do Tile Painting Step 7 Version 2.jpg
  5. Wait at least 24 hours for the primer to dry. Check the primer’s label for a precise drying time. If you’re working in an area with a lot of moisture, like the bathroom, you may want to wait 48 hours.[8]
    Do Tile Painting Step 8 Version 2.jpg

EditPainting Your Tile

  1. Decide on your colors or design. If you are painting existing tile in your home, make sure that the colors you choose complement the rest of your design scheme. It is usually best to choose light colors when painting your tile, as dark or bright colors can overwhelm a room. If you’re painting a design, choose one that will be easy for you to do and will look good in your home.[9]
    Do Tile Painting Step 9 Version 2.jpg
  2. Create a painted design (optional). If you want to paint a design, try searching for inspiration in Spanish, Portuguese, or Chinese tile paintings. You could also try a geometric design, like a chevron pattern or checks.
    Do Tile Painting Step 10 Version 2.jpg
  3. Transfer your design to the tile with a pencil. If you have an intricate design, draw it on the tile with pencil first. Be sure to press the pencil very lightly so that it is easy to hide with paint and/or erase if necessary. You can also practice on paper beforehand.[10]
    Do Tile Painting Step 11 Version 2.jpg
  4. Paint your tile. If you are painting a design, start with the lightest color first to avoid smudges, and let each color dry before starting a new one. If you’re painting a home surface in a solid color, apply the paint in multiple thin layers. It’s usually necessary to do at least 3 layers, especially if your paint color is lighter than the original color.[11]
    Do Tile Painting Step 12 Version 2.jpg
    • Painting over the grout is much easier than trying to avoid it, and it isn’t noticeable if you choose a light color.
  5. Let the paint dry for at least 24 hours. For small art projects, 24 hours will be enough, but for larger home surfaces, wait for at least 48 hours. This is especially important for high-traffic areas like the bathroom or kitchen counter.[12]
    Do Tile Painting Step 13 Version 2.jpg
    • If you’ve painted a ceramic bathtub, wait for several days before filling it with warm water.
  6. Coat with clear urethane to seal in the paint. You can buy urethane from any home supply store. It’s important to use a sealant like urethane that is made for ceramics, especially if you’re painting kitchen or bathroom tiles that get a lot of use and come into contact with moisture. Apply according to the package directions and let it dry thoroughly before touching your tile.[13]
    Do Tile Painting Step 14.jpg

EditTips

  • Consider adding an accent tile to brighten up a boring surface.
  • Paint with patience. The more attention you pay to detail the better your project will turn out.
  • Glass paint may work on very high-gloss tile.

EditWarnings

  • Be sure to take the appropriate safety methods when using power tools and/or dealing with potentially toxic fumes by wearing safety goggles and a painter’s mask.
  • Re-painting tile on home surfaces is not a permanent fix and will most likely need to be repainted in the future.

EditThings You’ll Need

  • Ceramic tile
  • Cleaning products to prep surface
  • Orbital sander with 1800 grit sandpaper (if necessary)
  • Safety goggles and a painter’s mask
  • Newspaper or drop cloth for covering workspace
  • Water for cleaning brushes
  • Non-water-based paint (tile paint, epoxy, enamel, oil-based paint)
  • Paintbrush
  • Clear urethane

EditRelated wikiHows

EditSources and Citations

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How to Wear Glitter on Your Face

Glitter makes just about everything better. Whether you are secretly a mermaid or just like all things sparkly, you can’t go wrong with adding a little bit of glitter to your makeup routine. While using crafting glitter can irritate your skin, cosmetic-grade glitter is a safe alternative. You can find it online and in well-stocked beauty shops. The application process is quick, simple, and totally picture-worthy.

EditSteps

EditApplying Glitter to Your Eyelids

  1. Apply your base makeup first, if you will be wearing any. If you plan on wearing foundation or eyeshadow, now is the time to apply them. Set your look with setting powder or setting spray, but hold off on the mascara and eyeliner. Doing this stuff first reduces the chances of you accidentally rubbing the glitter off and messing up your look.
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 1.jpg
  2. Apply a thin coat of petroleum jelly to your eyelids. You can also apply the petroleum jelly to your brow bone instead for a different look.[1] If you don’t have petroleum jelly or if you don’t want to use it, try clear lip balm or clear lip gloss instead.[2]
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 2.jpg
    • For a bolder look, use a Q-tip or thin makeup brush to apply the petroleum jelly to your crease. Flare it out in a wing-tip or cat eye.
    • For a more subtle look, use a thin, liner brush to apply eyelash adhesive to your upper lash line. Do not apply it to your waterline, however.
  3. Choose cosmetic-grade glitter that goes well with your makeup. You can find this type of glitter online and in a beauty supply shop. A fine-grained glitter would be even better because it would be less likely to fall off. Do not use regular glitter from the arts and crafts store.
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 3.jpg
    • For a subtle look, try a neutral color, such as ivory, iridescent, peach, or gold.
    • For a bold look, try an unnatural color, such as orange, red, blue, purple, etc.
    • If you are already wearing eyeshadow, choose glitter in a similar color.
  4. Pat the glitter onto your eyelid with an eyeshadow brush. Dip an eyeshadow brush (preferably one with firm bristles) into the pot of glitter first. Close your eyes and tilt your head back. Gently pat the brush against your eyelid, focusing on the area where you applied the petroleum jelly.
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 4.jpg
    • If you are applying glitter to your lash line, use a damp Q-tip to pick up and apply the glitter.[3]
  5. Finish and clean up the look. Use a Q-tip to sharpen any corners or edges, such as wing-tips. If you got glitter some place where you did not want it, press a piece of clear tape against your skin where the unwanted glitter is, then pull it off.[4] Apply a coat of mascara, if desired, but skip the eyeliner, otherwise the glitter may come off.
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 5.jpg
    • If you applied the glitter to just your crease or brow bone, you can apply some eyeliner for a more glamorous look.
  6. Avoid rubbing your eyes while wearing glitter. The glitter may shed during the day, but not rubbing or touching your eyes will reduce the chances of this happening. If you do get glitter in your eye, use eye drops to get it out. You can also irrigate your eyes to rinse the glitter out instead.[5]
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 6.jpg
  7. Use an oil-based eye makeup remover to wipe the glitter off at night. Soak a cotton round in an oil-based makeup remover it, then swipe it across your eyelid. If you did not get all of the glitter off, use the other (clean) side to swipe your eyelid again. If you got glitter between your lashes, use a Q-tip dipped in an oil-based makeup remover, to lightly pick it off.[6]
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 7.jpg

EditApplying Glitter to Your Lips

  1. Exfoliate your lips for extra smoothness, if desired. Dampen your lips with water first. Next, gently exfoliate them with a soft toothbrush or a sugar lip scrub for a few seconds. Rinse your lips with water again, pat them dry, then apply a lip balm.
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 8.jpg
    • You don’t have to do this, but it will make the lipstick and glitter application easier, especially if your lips are chapped.
  2. Apply your choice of lipstick. Apply a coat of lipstick with a lip brush or straight from the tube. Blot it with a tissue, then apply a second coat. Do not blot this second coat; you need the wet lipstick in order for the glitter to adhere.[7]
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 9.jpg
    • Use a creamy lipstick that comes in a tube rather than liquid lipstick or lip stain, otherwise the glitter may not stick.[8]
  3. Choose a cosmetic-grade glitter that matches your lipstick color. You can find cosmetic-grade glitter in beauty supply shops and online; don’t use glitter from the craft store. For a smoother look, use the finest glitter that you can find. If the glitter is too chunky, your finished look may look gritty or grainy.[9]
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 10.jpg
    • If you can’t find a matching color, try using iridescent instead. You can also pair gold glitter with warm colors (such as red) and silver glitter for cool colors (such as blue).
  4. Use your finger or a lipstick brush to pat the glitter onto your lips. Dip your finger or lipstick brush into the glitter, then firmly pat it onto your lips. Keep repeating this step until your lips are all covered.[10]
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 11.jpg
    • If the glitter is not sticking to your lips, apply some petroleum jelly or clear clip gloss/lip balm, then try again.[11]
  5. Press your lips together to seal the glitter in place. Do not press a napkin between your lips like you normally would with lipstick, or you will remove the glitter. Simply press your lips together into a thin line for a second or two, then open them again.[12]
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 12.jpg
  6. Blot the lipstick and glitter with your finger. Stick your finger into your mouth, then slowly pull it out. Be sure to purse your lips while doing so. This will remove any glitter that got caught inside your lips without accidentally removing the glitter that’s already on your lips.[13]
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 13.jpg
    • Use a piece of tape to pick off any stray bits of glitter caught outside your lip line.
    • Do not blot your lips with a tissue.
  7. Use an oil-based remover to remove the glitter at the end of the day. Soak a tissue or cotton round in an oil-based makeup remover, then wipe it across your lips. If you did not get all of the glitter off on the first wipe, use the other side of the cotton round. Once you get the glitter off, you can remove the lipstick with a tissue.
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 14.jpg

EditApplying Glitter to Your Cheeks and Forehead

  1. Have your base makeup done. You don’t have to do your lips or eye makeup yet, but you should do your primer and foundation first. If you want to set your makeup with setting powder or setting spray, do so now. If you apply either of these products after you apply the glitter, you risk removing the glitter.[14]
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 15.jpg
    • You can also skip the foundation and primer altogether for a simpler, fresh-faced look.
  2. Choose a skin-safe adhesive. Hair gel is a great, cheap choice for most people, including those with sensitive skin.[15] You can also use a special adhesive made specifically for adhering glitter to skin. Aloe vera gel and petroleum jelly may also work.
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 16.jpg
    • You can buy special adhesives for cosmetic-grade glitter online and in beauty supply shops.
  3. Pick a cosmetic-grade glitter color. You can use extra-fine glitter or even chunky glitter, but it must be cosmetic-grade. You can find this stuff online and in beauty supply shops; do not use crafting glitter. Think about how the glitter will look with the rest of your makeup and outfit. Choose colors that will go well with your overall look.
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 17.jpg
    • For a more unique look, consider getting extra-fine glitter and body sequins/rhinestones. This way, you can layer the two together.
  4. Use a small makeup brush to apply the adhesive. Choose a makeup brush with stiffer bristles, such as a lipstick brush. Apply a thin coat of adhesive wherever you want the glitter to go. If you will be applying to glitter to both sides of your face, do just one side for right now.[16]
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 18.jpg
    • It is better to work in small areas rather than large ones, otherwise the adhesive will dry out too fast.
    • You can do a random design, such as a streak, or you can do a specific design, such as a heart. You can even use stencils for something more intricate.
  5. Use the same brush to pat the glitter into the adhesive. Dip the brush into your pot of cosmetic-grade glitter, then gently pat it against the adhesive. Keep repeating this step until you get the glitter all over the adhesive.[17]
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 19.jpg
    • If you are working with extra-fine glitter, you may have to use a clean, soft makeup brush instead.
  6. Apply additional layers of glitter to create dimension, if desired. At this point, you can call it a day and go to show off your new glittered look, or you can keep adding more layers. Use a thin brush to add dots of adhesive onto already-glittered parts, then add skin-safe sequins or body glitter.
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 20.jpg
  7. Use an oil-based makeup remover to clean the glitter off. Soak a cotton round in an oil-based makeup remover, then wipe it across the glittered parts of your face. If you need to get more glitter off, use the other side of the cotton round.
    Wear Glitter on Your Face Step 21.jpg

EditTips

  • You can buy cosmetic-grade glitter online and in well-stocked beauty supply shops. Do not use craft-grade glitter. Even the extra-fine crafting glitter can irritate your skin.
  • Use a cotton round soaked in an oil-based makeup remover to wipe the glitter off.[18] Don’t use water to remove the glitter.[19]
  • Use lighter colors where the light will naturally strike your face, such as the brow bone or cheekbones. Use richer colors on your lips, lid, and creases.[20]
  • Don’t be afraid to layer your look. Try placing sequins or rhinestones on top of extra-fine glitter for a mermaid look.[21]

EditWarnings

  • Do not rub your face or eyes while wearing glitter.
  • Never apply crafting glitter on your face, including the extra-fine glitter.
  • Never apply glitter (including cosmetic-grade) to your waterline. Doing so greatly increases the risk that you’ll get glitter in your eyes.

EditThings You’ll Need

EditApplying Glitter to Your Eyelids

  • Petroleum jelly or clear lip balm/lip gloss
  • Cosmetic-grade glitter
  • Firm-bristled makeup brush
  • Oil-based eye makeup remover
  • Cotton rounds

EditApplying Glitter to Your Lips

  • Lipstick
  • Fine, cosmetic-grade glitter
  • Lipstick brush
  • Oil-based makeup remover
  • Cotton rounds or tissues

EditApplying Glitter to Your Cheeks and Forehead

  • Hair gel
  • Cosmetic-grade glitter
  • Small paintbrush or makeup brush
  • Oil-based makeup remover
  • Cotton rounds

EditSources and Citations

Cite error: <ref> tags exist, but no <references/> tag was found

How to Make Giblet Gravy

Giblet gravy is a delicious gravy that is perfect as a topping for turkey, mashed potatoes, and any other Thanksgiving fare. The gravy is made by simmering the giblets of a turkey, including the liver, heart, gizzard, and neck, then adding the roast drippings from the rest of the cooked bird as well as thickening. The result is a delectable gravy that is a great way to use parts of the turkey which might otherwise go to waste.

EditIngredients

  • 1 bag of turkey giblets, as well as the neck
  • ½ cup (118.2 ml) of drippings from a roasted turkey or chicken
  • 4 cups (946.3 ml) no sodium chicken, turkey or vegetable broth
  • pinch of salt
  • pinch of pepper

EditSteps

EditCooking the Giblets

  1. Place the giblets in a pot over medium heat. Take the giblets of an uncooked turkey and rinse them. Place them in a medium sized pot and pour in enough water so that it covers the giblets completely by about 2 inches (5.08 cm). Then turn the heat up to medium and let them cook.[1]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 1 Version 3.jpg
    • Many butchers remove the neck and other giblet parts and put them in a sealed bag which they place in the body cavity of the bird.[2]
    • While you are making the giblet gravy, you should also Cook a Turkey. You will use the drippings collected from the turkey to add to the gravy, so be sure to roast the turkey in a pan that collects the drippings in the bottom.
    • Try to time the cooking of your turkey so that it is done roasting either right before you make the gravy or after you finish cooking the giblets.
  2. Bring the giblets to a boil. Cook the giblets over medium heat until they reach a boil. Once the water is boiling, turn the heat down to low and let the giblets simmer for one hour.[3]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 2 Version 3.jpg
    • Simmering the giblets cooks the meat and also infuses the water with flavor to make a broth.
  3. Take the cooked giblets out of the broth. Once the giblets have simmered for about an hour, the meat will be cooked through and the water will have been turned into a broth. Use a slotted spoon to remove the giblet meat and the neck and reserve the broth.[4]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 3 Version 3.jpg
  4. Remove the meat from the neck. Wait until the neck has cooled, then use your fingers to pick and strip the meat away from the neck. It should come off in thin strips. When you have taken off all the meat, dispose of the remainder of the neck.[5]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 4 Version 3.jpg
  5. Chop the giblets. Place the giblets on a cutting board, then use a heavy knife to dice them into small pieces about ½ inch (1.27 cm) long. Then combine the neck meat with the giblet meat and set them aside while you prepare the rest of the gravy.[6]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 5 Version 3.jpg

EditGetting the Turkey Drippings

  1. Remove the cooked turkey from the oven. While you are making the giblet broth, you should also be roasting the rest of the bird. When the turkey is done roasting, take it out of the oven and move the cooked turkey off of the roasting pan.[7]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 6 Version 3.jpg
  2. Pour the drippings into a bowl. Take the roasting pan that the turkey was cooking on and pour the drippings into a medium sized bowl. Use oven mitts because the pan will be extremely hot![8]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 7 Version 3.jpg
  3. Let the liquid separate. Leave the turkey drippings in the bowl for about fifteen minutes. You should see that the liquid starts to separate, with the dark drippings at the bottom of the bowl and the clear fat rising to the top.[9]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 8 Version 3.jpg
  4. Skim the fat off the liquid. After the mixture has finished separating, use a ladle or large spoon to scoop the clear fat on top out of the mixture. Make sure not to use too much force and mix up the liquid as you are scooping out the fat.[10]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 9 Version 2.jpg
    • You can also slowly lower the ladle into the liquid and let the fat spill over into the bowl of the ladle. This will ensure that the mixture doesn’t get mixed.
    • Reserve some of the fat so that you can add it to the gravy.

EditCombining the Ingredients Into a Gravy

  1. Place the roasting pan over medium low heat. Take the roasting pan you used to make the turkey and straddle it over two burners. Turn the heat up to medium low on both burners and allow the pan to heat.[11]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 10 Version 2.jpg
    • Using the roasting pan as opposed to a clean pan gives the gravy more flavor, because the dried drippings coating the bottom of the pan will get liquefied by the heat and will add to the flavor of the gravy.
  2. Pour in some of the fat. Once the pan has heated, pour some of the fat that you separated out from the drippings into the pan. Add as much or as little as you want, depending on how rich you want the gravy, but make sure to add at least two tablespoons (29.5 ml).[12]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 11 Version 2.jpg
  3. Sprinkle in flour and whisk. Once the fat has heated, about two minutes, add in ½ cup (118.2 ml) of flour. Use a whisk to mix the fat and the flour to make a paste. If the paste looks too thin or greasy, add in a few more pinches of flour until the consistency is thick.[13]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 12 Version 2.jpg
    • Keep cooking the mixture, whisking constantly, until it browns, about ten minutes.
  4. Add in broth and the half of the separated drippings. Pour in the 4 cups (946.3 ml) of no sodium chicken, turkey or vegetable broth. Then add in half of the drippings that you separated from the fat.[14]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 13 Version 2.jpg
  5. Mix the gravy and cook until it thickens. Use a whisk to mix the broth and the drippings in with the flour paste. Cook it until the gravy has thickened, about five to ten minutes.[15]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 14 Version 2.jpg
  6. Add in the chopped neck and giblets. When you are happy with the consistency and thickness of the gravy, add in the chopped giblets and neck meat. Stir to mix the meat in with the liquid.[16]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 15 Version 2.jpg
  7. Add salt and pepper to taste. After you add in the giblet meat, spoon up and taste the gravy. Add salt and pepper if you wish. You can also add more fat or drippings for more flavor.[17]
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 16 Version 2.jpg
  8. Serve while hot. Serve the giblet gravy by drizzling it over turkey, mashed potatoes or green beans. If the gravy gets cold before serving, heat it up in a pot over the stove or microwave it in a microwave-safe bowl. Store any leftover gravy in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to three days.
    Make Giblet Gravy Step 17 Version 2.jpg

EditTips

  • Add other spices like oregano, thyme or rosemary if you wish.
  • You can also use a chicken to make giblet gravy. Follow the same steps, just substitute a chicken for the turkey.

EditWhat You’ll Need

  • Pan for roasting turkey
  • Ladle
  • Slotted spoon
  • Colander
  • Whisk
  • Medium sized pot
  • Medium sized bowl

EditSources and Citations

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How to Get EU Citizenship

Citizenship in the European Union (EU) comes with the ability to work, travel, or study anywhere in the EU without a visa. The road towards citizenship can take several years. To receive EU citizenship, you must actually apply for citizenship in an EU country. The process for citizenship varies from country to country. In general, you will need to live in the country for a certain number of years, gather proof of your eligibility to be a citizen, and submit an application. Citizenship tests, language tests, and an application fee may also be required. If you have already been living in an EU country for a while, however, you may have a strong chance at getting citizenship.

EditSteps

EditMeeting the Requirements

  1. Establish residency in an EU country. If you are not already living in an EU country, you will need to move to one to become a resident. Immigrating is a very serious and expensive decision that will require you to apply for a visa, find a job, learn a new language, and remain in the country for several years.[1]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 1.jpg
    • There are 28 countries in the EU. Becoming a citizen of any one of them will grant you EU citizenship. Each has different requirements for becoming a citizen, however.
    • Remember that not all countries in Europe belong to the EU. Moving to Norway, Macedonia, or Switzerland will not help you gain EU citizenship.
    • Keep in mind that the UK is currently in the process of leaving the EU. If you apply for British citizenship, you may not have EU citizenship permanently.
  2. Determine how long you must live in the country to become a citizen. Most countries require that you live there for at least 5 years, although some may have longer residency requirements. Look up how long you will have to live in your desired country before applying for citizenship.[2]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 2.jpg
    • For example, you must live in Germany for 8 years to get a passport. In France, you only need to be a resident for 5 years.
  3. Consider your spouse’s citizenship. If your spouse is a citizen of an EU country, you may be able to apply for citizenship through them. Depending on where they have citizenship, marriage to an EU citizen might shorten the amount of time you need to live in the country before applying for citizenship.[3]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 3.jpg
    • In Sweden, you normally need to live in the country for 5 years before applying for citizenship. If you are married or in a registered partnership with a Swedish citizen, however, you only need to live there for 3 years.[4]
  4. Learn the language of the country you are living in. Many EU countries have language requirements before you can apply for citizenship. Some may require you to take a language course while others ask you to complete a basic language test. Countries with language requirements or tests include:[5]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 4.jpg
  5. Check to see if you have ancestry in any EU countries. Some EU countries will allow the children or grandchildren of citizens become a citizen themselves, even if they do not live in the country themselves. These laws are called jus sanguinis (or right by blood).[6]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 5.jpg
    • Ireland, Italy, and Greece will give citizenship to children and grandchildren of citizens. Hungary includes great-grandchildren.
    • In Germany and the UK, you can only get citizenship this way if your parents were citizens.
    • Some countries will have requirements on when your ancestor left the country. For example, in Poland, you can get citizenship if your ancestor left after 1951 while in Spain, your ancestors must have left between 1936 and 1955.

EditApplying for Citizenship

  1. Gather your documents. Make copies of the important documents. Do not submit the original document. While the exact requirements may vary from country to country, in general, you will need:[7]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 6.jpg
    • A copy of your birth certificate
    • A copy of your current passport
    • Proof of residency, such as job records, bank statements, travel records, or official mail with your address on it.
    • Proof of employment, such as a signed statement from your employer. If you’re retired or self-employed, show financial records to demonstrate that you are financially stable.
    • If you are married to a citizen of the country, you will need proof of the marriage, such as a marriage certificate, birth certificates of any children, and family photos.
  2. Fill out the application. This application is typically available on the website of the country’s department of immigration. Read through the application carefully before filling it out. While the application is different in every country, you may need to state:[8]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 7.jpg
    • Your full name
    • Current and previous addresses
    • Date of birth
    • Current citizenship
    • Education
    • How long you have been a resident in the country
    • Details about your family, including your parents, spouse, and children.
  3. Pay the application fee. You may have to pay for the application to be processed. These fees can wary widely. Some examples of application fees include:[9]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 8.jpg
    • Ireland: €175
    • Germany: €255
    • Sweden: 1,500 SEK
    • Spain: €60-100
  4. Take the citizenship test. A citizenship test shows that you are knowledgeable about the country’s customs, language, laws, history, and culture. These tests are short, but they are required in many EU countries.[10]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 9.jpg
    • For example, in Germany, you will be asked 33 questions about German history, law, and culture. You must answer at least 17 correctly.[11]
    • This test will usually be given in the country’s official language.
  5. Attend a hearing or interview if requested. In some countries, you must be interviewed by a judge or the police before you can receive citizenship. After you fill out your application, you will receive notification of the date and place of your hearing.[12]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 10.jpg
  6. Go to the citizenship ceremony. Most countries have a ceremony for new citizens. At this ceremony, citizens sworn in. You may receive a certificate of naturalization, proving your new citizenship. Once you have citizenship in an EU country, you are automatically an EU citizen.[13]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 11.jpg
    • You will usually hear back about whether you have received citizenship within 3 months of your application. Some countries may take much longer, however.
    • These ceremonies may take place in big cities or capitols.
    • Attendance at this ceremony is usually required for you to receive citizenship.

EditImproving Your Application

  1. Avoid leaving the country for long stretches of time. Your residency in the country must usually be continuous. This means that you must live only in that country for a specified amount of time. If you leave the country for longer than a few weeks a year, you may no longer be eligible for citizenship.[14]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 12.jpg
    • For example, in France, if you leave for more than 6 months, you may become ineligible for citizenship.
  2. Increase your yearly salary. Most countries will not give you citizenship unless you make a certain amount of money. Some may request proof that you are employed in the country. If you are married and do not work, you may need to provide details of your spouse’s job instead.[15]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 13.jpg
    • For example, in Denmark, you must prove that you are able to support yourself and your family without relying on any public assistance, such as housing or welfare.[16]
    • If you are a student, the requirements may vary. You may need to graduate and get a full-time job before you become eligible.
  3. Buy property in the country you are living in. If you own a house or land in the country to which you are applying for citizenship, you may have a better case. In some countries, such as Greece, Latvia, Portugal, and Cyprus, you can earn the right to citizenship just by owning a certain amount of property.[17]
    Get EU Citizenship Step 14.jpg

EditTips

  • Many countries, such as Cyprus and Austria will let you earn citizenship by investing money in the government, but these usually require at least a million euros of investment.
  • The laws vary widely from country to country when it comes to citizenship. Make sure to research and read the laws of the country to which you want citizenship.
  • Dual citizenship with an EU country will also grant you an EU citizenship.
  • Once you gain citizenship in Austria, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Latvia, or Lithuania, you will be required to renounce your previous citizenship.[18]

EditWarnings

  • If you have any criminal activity on your record, you may be denied citizenship.

EditSources and Citations

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How to Cook Strip Steak

Strip steaks are one of the simplest, richest meats you can cook. Steak does not require a lot of work to get right, and fussing with marinades and spices can detract from the naturally delicious flavor of a good cut of meat. That said, there are a lot of ways to cook a strip steak so that it comes out exactly how you’d like it.

EditIngredients

  • Strip steaks
  • Salt and pepper

EditSteps

EditUsing a Grill

  1. Know that outdoor grilling lends a rich, smoky flavor to your steak. Many people swear that a grilled steak, with a little salt and pepper, is one of nature’s finest meals. Strip steaks are naturally tender, and only need to be seared on the outside to remain flavorful and juicy. Depending on your grill, you can get very different flavors from your steak:
    Cook Strip Steak Step 1 Version 2.jpg
    • Propane: Gas grills impart little flavor on the meat, but are very easy to control. You can adjust the temperatures with a simple knob, allowing you to perfect the cooking process. They also heat up much faster than wood or charcoal.
    • Charcoal: Briquettes light up quickly and get hot quickly, and they impart a rich, smoky flavor on the meat.
    • Wood-fire: Wood chips, like hickory or oak, often give the best natural flavor to the meat, but they are harder to maintain and light. Many people use a mixture of charcoal and wood instead of just wood-chops.[1]
  2. Pre-heat your grill to medium-high. If you are using charcoal and/or wood this might take 30-40 minutes (most of the briquettes should be covered in gray ash), but propane grills will only take a few minutes. If you have a thermometer, aim to have the inside of the grill around 400°F. The thinner the steak, the hotter you want the grill, since you don’t want to completely cook the inside of the steak before the outside is nice and browned:
    Cook Strip Steak Step 2 Version 2.jpg
    • 1/2 inch thick: 425-450°F. You shouldn’t be able to hold your hand over the grill for more than 3 seconds.
    • 3/4-1 inch thick: 360-400°F You shouldn’t be able to hold your hand over the grill for more than 4-5 seconds.
    • 1-1 1/2 inch thick: 325-360°F You shouldn’t be able to hold your hand over the grill for more than 5-6 seconds.[2]
  3. Rub the steak with salt and pepper while the grill heats. There is an expression that goes, “salt and pepper are the little black dress of the steak world.” Odd connotations aside, the fact is that most steaks are best with only a little bit of seasoning. Rub 1/2 tablespoon of both salt and crushed black pepper on both sides of the steak and let it sit at room temperature for 15-20 minutes while the grill heats.[3]
    Cook Strip Steak Step 3 Version 2.jpg
    • To determine the amount of salt, think of it as a light snow on an asphalt road — you can see the road, but the snow (salt) is covering most of it.[4]
    • Bigger kernels of salt, like course sea salt or kosher salt, will help the outside caramelize better, so avoid using fine table salt if you can.[5]
  4. Place your steak over direct heat on the grill. You want to sear the outside, caramelizing it for perfect texture and flavor. Slap the steak over the flame and then leave it alone. Resist the urge to poke, prod, or move it as it cooks.
    Cook Strip Steak Step 4 Version 2.jpg
  5. Cook each side of the steak over direct heat for 7-10 minutes, depending on desired doneness. They should be browned when you flip them over. If they are black, the grill was too hot. Remember this when you flip the steak and lower the heat, or cook it for half the time. If they are pink, the grill was not hot enough, so try and raise the heat or leave them over the flame for another 2-3 minutes. For reference:
    Cook Strip Steak Step 5 Version 2.jpg
    • Medium rare steaks should be grilled for roughly 7 minutes a side.
    • Medium steaks should be grilled for roughly 10 minutes a side.
    • Well done steaks should be cooked for ten minutes on each side, then left on indirect heat to keep cooking.
    • Use tongs to turn the steak, as piercing it with a fork causes the juices to leak out.[6]
  6. Remove the steak from direct heat and let it cook indirectly until desired doneness. Move the steak to another side of the grill, one without direct flame, and let it keep cooking until the inside is done to your liking. On a charcoal grill, open or close the top vent to control the smokiness — the tighter it is shut, the smokier the meat will get. You can use a meat thermometer to gauge the meat, or just estimate with time.
    Cook Strip Steak Step 6 Version 2.jpg
    • Rare: 130-135°F. Remove immediately after flipping each side.
    • Medium-Rare: 140°F. Sear each side for an extra minute longer than you would for a rare steak.
    • Medium: 155°F. Let it continue cooking for an extra 1-2 minutes off of direct heat. Flip halfway through.
    • Well Done: 165°F Let the steak cook on indirect heat for 3-4 minutes, flipping halfway through.[7]
  7. Let the steak stand for 10 minutes after removing from the grill. This locks in the juices and flavors, which will escape if you cut it immediately. Tent a piece of aluminum foil over the steak and let it sit before slicing into it.[8]
    Cook Strip Steak Step 7 Version 2.jpg

EditUsing a Stove-Top

  1. Choose a thinner steak if you are cooking on a stovetop. In order to cook the best steak on the stove, you should aim for a piece of meat that is roughly 1 inch thick. This allows you to sear the outsides quickly why still getting the insides well done.[9]
    Cook Strip Steak Step 8 Version 2.jpg
    • If your steak is thicker, you’ll need to cook the steak on low for a longer period of time after searing both sides.
  2. Take the steak out of the fridge 20-30 minutes in advance. Let steaks stand 30 minutes at room temperature so they are not cool and the outsides can cook quickly.[10]
    Cook Strip Steak Step 9.jpg
  3. Season the steaks generously with salt and pepper. Rub both sides of the steak with salt and pepper so that it is well encrusted. The bigger the salt you can get (kosher, coarse sea-salt, etc.) the better: bigger pieces of salt stay crunchy and take less time to dissolve into the meat.
    Cook Strip Steak Step 10.jpg
    • You want a fair amount of salt on the meat– it shouldn’t be all white, but there should be salt on every part of the steak.
  4. Heat a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add 1/2 tablespoon olive oil to the pan and swirl to coat. The oil should be smoking just a little, so faint wisps of smoke are coming off the surface.
    Cook Strip Steak Step 11.jpg
    • Some cooks swear by coconut oil, which has a mild flavor but a high smoking point, allowing you to really cook the outside of the steak.[11]
    • If you do not have a cast-iron skillet you can use a normal frying pan instead, but you may need more oil.
  5. Add steaks to pan and cook for 3-4 minutes on each side, or until browned. You want a nice, caramelized exterior on both sides — brown but not black. If you flip the steak and it is still pink, turn it back over and leave it until it is nice and crispy on one side.
    Cook Strip Steak Step 12.jpg
  6. Reduce the heat and cook to your desired doneness. Lower the heat to medium-low and cook the steak until the inside is your preferred level of done. If you have a meat thermometer you can use this to get your steak perfect every time:
    Cook Strip Steak Step 13.jpg
    • Rare: 130-135°F. Remove immediately after flipping each side.
    • Medium-Rare: 140°F. Cook for an additional 1-3 minutes on each side.
    • Medium: 155°F. Cook for an additional 3-5 minutes on each side.
    • Well Done: 165°F Cook the steak for an additional 5-7 minutes on each side.[12]
  7. Let the steak stand for 10 minutes before cutting into it. You don’t want to eat your steak right after it comes off. Waiting locks in juices and flavor as they soak into the meat. Tent a piece of aluminum foil over the steak and let it rest before slicing.[13]
    Cook Strip Steak Step 14.jpg

EditVariations

  1. Try rubbing a dry seasoning over the meat 30 minutes before cooking. Dry rubs add flavor to meat without ruining their tenderness, letting you customize your meat to fit the meal. Mix the following spices together with 1/2 tablespoon salt and crushed black pepper before massaging the rub into both sides of the meat. Use equal parts of each spice, roughly 1-1/2 tablespoons, and don’t be afraid to mix and match. These rubs are enough for 2-3 steaks.
    Cook Strip Steak Step 15.jpg
    • Onion powder, paprika, chili powder, and garlic powder.
    • Dried rosemary, thyme, and oregano, garlic powder.
    • Cayenne, chili powder, paprika, Mexican oregano, garlic powder.[14]
    • Brown sugar, chili pepper, paprika, garlic powder, and ground coffee (adventurous cooks only!)[15]
  2. Use a wet marinade to get moist, delicious flavor into your steaks. Wet marinades are usually effective overnight, so don’t try do make one at the last minute and expect a lot of flavor. The acid in wet marinades (vinegar, lemon juice, etc.) also breaks down some of the tissue, making the meat more tender.[16] Be careful though, too much acid can ruin the texture of a steak and make a crispy exterior impossible. Place the steaks in a bag with the marinade and leave them in the fridge overnight to get the best results. Experiment with additional spices or different combinations to find the marinade you love.
    Cook Strip Steak Step 16.jpg
    • 1/3 cups of soy sauce, olive oil, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, plus 1-2 tablespoons garlic powder, dried basil, parsley, rosemary, and crushed black pepper.[17]
    • 1/3 cup red wine vinegar, 1/2 cup soy sauce, 1 cup vegetable oil, 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce, 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard, 2-3 cloves minced garlic, 1 tablespoon ground black pepper.
  3. Add a pat of butter to the top of the steak for an extra richness. There is a reason that most steakhouse steaks come with a pat of butter on top. Butter can seep into the cuts of the meat and elevate it with a delicious, moist flavor. You can even make “compound butter” (butter mixed with spices and herbs) to get a little extra flavor. To make compound butter, mix 6 tablespoons butter with the following herbs in a food processor, then freeze the mixture until it is time to put on your steak:
    Cook Strip Steak Step 17.jpg
    • 1 teaspoon thyme, sage, rosemary, chopped.
    • 2-3 cloves minced garlic
    • 1 teaspoon chili powder, cilantro, and cayenne pepper.
  4. Top your steak with something extra to make a perfect entree. Most steaks can stand by themselves as delicious meals, but a little something extra can make them even better. Things to try on top include:
    Cook Strip Steak Step 18.jpg
    • Caramelized onions, peppers, or mushrooms.
    • Fried onions.
    • Blue cheese crumbles.

EditVideo

EditTips

  • Patting down the steaks with a paper towel before seasoning removes moisture and can make browning easier.

EditRelated wikiHows

EditSources and Citations

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How to Dye Feathers

If you need to dye feathers for a costume or craft project, you can easily do so using fabric dye, food coloring, or even powdered drink mix. Simply mix the color bath in a bowl and submerge the feathers. Leave them in until they reach the desired shade, then take the feathers out of the color bath and rinse them out. Let them dry, then use them however you wish.

EditSteps

EditCreating a Color Bath

  1. Protect yourself and your workspace. Place several layers of newspaper over your workspace to ensure any drips or spills won’t ruin your countertop or table. Keep paper towels handy in case of a spill. Wear old clothes or an apron, and put on rubber gloves to protect your skin from the dye.[1]
    Dye Feathers Step 1.jpg
  2. Mix a dye bath in a bowl. You can use powder or liquid fabric dye. Refer to the package instructions for the ratio of dye to water. Generally, you’ll use ¼ cup (59 mL) of liquid dye or 1 tablespoon (15 mL) of powdered dye with 1 quart (946 mL) of hot water. The water temperature should be about 140° F (60° C).[2]
    Dye Feathers Step 2.jpg
  3. Use food coloring to make a color bath. Fill a container that your feathers will fit in with 2 parts hot water (140° F or 60° C) and 1 part vinegar. Add 1 drop of food coloring at a time until you reach the desired shade—5 or 6 drops should be plenty.[3]
    Dye Feathers Step 3.jpg
  4. Make a color bath from drink mix. Powdered drink mixes, like Kool-Aid, can be used to dye feathers. Feel free to mix colors together, if desired. Use 1 6.2-gram package of drink mix per 1 cup (237 mL) of hot water (140° F or 60° C). Add the mix and the water to a large bowl.[4]
    Dye Feathers Step 4.jpg
    • If the color is too light, add more drink mix. If it is too dark, add more water.
  5. Mix the color bath with a stir stick. Use a wooden skewer you don’t mind throwing away or a stainless steel spoon, which the color won’t stain. Make sure to thoroughly combine the ingredients, stirring until all the powder is dissolved, if applicable.
    Dye Feathers Step 5.jpg

EditColoring the Feathers

  1. Wash natural feathers with mild soap. Natural feathers need to be washed first to remove oils that can prevent the dye from sticking. Fill a bowl or bucket with warm water and a small amount of mild soap. Place the feathers in the bowl and swirl them around. Let them sit for a few minutes, then rinse them with running water.[5]
    Dye Feathers Step 6.jpg
    • If you purchased your feathers from a craft store you can skip this step.
  2. Submerge the feathers in the color bath. Carefully place the feathers in the color bath, making sure that all parts and tips are submerged. Press down on the feathers with your stir stick or skewer to keep them submerged if they begin to float.[6]
    Dye Feathers Step 7.jpg
  3. Allow them to soak until they reach the desired color. Feathers will absorb color quickly, so they may only need to sit in the color bath for as little as 2 minutes. If you want a darker color, you may need to leave them in for up to 15 minutes. Stir the mixture every few minutes to ensure the color gets absorbed evenly.[7]
    Dye Feathers Step 8.jpg
    • A small amount of color will come out when you rinse the feathers, so let them soak until they are a shade darker than desired.
  4. Rinse the feathers with cool water. Carefully remove the feathers from the color bath and transfer them to the sink. Use cool, running water to remove the excess color. Keep rinsing the feathers until the water runs clear.[8]
    Dye Feathers Step 9.jpg
    • After this rinse, the color shouldn’t fade or rub off as it is permanent.
  5. Let the feathers air dry. Lay the feathers out on several layers of newspaper or paper towel. Turn them over a few times throughout the process to ensure both sides dry fully.[9]
    Dye Feathers Step 10.jpg
    • Alternatively, you can speed up the process by using a blow dryer on a cool setting.

EditTips

  • Dark feathers won’t absorb or show the color of the dye well, so it’s best to begin with white or light-colored feathers.

EditThings You’ll Need

  • Old clothes or apron
  • Rubber gloves
  • Newspaper
  • Paper towels
  • Bowls or buckets
  • Water
  • Mild soap
  • Fabric dye, food coloring, or powdered drink mix
  • Vinegar (if using food coloring)
  • Skewer, stainless steel spoon, or stir stick

EditSources and Citations

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How to Grow Cactus Indoors

Cacti are typically desert-dwelling plants that thrive in dry and hot conditions, but these plants also make excellent indoor houseplants. Cacti are quite low-maintenance, making them an ideal plant for new gardeners and a great housewarming gift. The secrets to growing healthy cacti indoors include providing them with plenty of sunlight, not overwatering, and using the right soil.

EditSteps

EditPropagating New Plants

  1. Take a cutting from a healthy cactus. You can grow new cacti from a pup that shoots off of a healthy mother plant. Choose a pup that’s plump, unblemished, and healthy. Gently cut or break off an entire pup from the plant.[1]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 1 Version 3.jpg
    • You can also buy cacti at local nurseries, home stores, and garden centers.
  2. Let the wound heal. Transfer the cutting to a sunny windowsill. Lay the cutting down flat and leave it for about two days. This will give the wound time to form a callous. If you don’t let the wound heal before planting, the cutting will likely rot.[2]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 2 Version 3.jpg
  3. Select a pot for the cactus. The most important thing to remember when choosing a pot for a cactus is drainage. Find a pot with drainage holes in the bottom that will allow excess water to drain out. Cacti also do well in smaller pots, so choose a pot that’s about twice the size of the plant.
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 3 Version 3.jpg
    • You can use clay or plastic pots for cacti. Plastic pots are lighter and cheaper, but heavier clay pots are better for large or top-heavy plants.[3]
  4. Fill the pot with a cactus-specific potting soil. Cacti need soil that drains very quickly, so choose a medium that’s specific for these types of plants. For even better drainage, mix two parts of the cactus potting soil with one part lava rock pebbles or pearlite.
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 4 Version 3.jpg
    • Cacti that sit in wet soil are prone to fungal and bacterial growth.[4]
  5. Plant the cutting in the soil. Place the stem or leaf cutting callous-down in the potting soil. Push the cutting in just deep enough so that it will stand up on its own. Use your hands to gently firm the soil around the cutting to stabilize it.[5]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 5 Version 3.jpg
  6. Mist the soil. Moisten the soil to provide the cactus with extra water, but don’t soak the soil. Until roots and new growth start to form, only mist the cutting lightly when the soil feels dry. Otherwise, the cutting may rot.[6]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 6 Version 3.jpg
  7. Keep the cutting in a bright location. Transfer the cutting to a windowsill or other area that gets lots of bright but indirect sunlight. Too much direct sun can damage a new cutting. Leave the cutting in this location for a month or two, until new growth starts to appear.[7]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 7 Version 3.jpg

EditCaring for Cacti

  1. Choose a sunny location. Once established, most species of cacti need several hours of direct sunlight every day. A south- or east-facing window will be ideal for most cacti. However, if the cactus starts to look yellowed, bleached, or orangey, it is likely getting too much light, and you should move it to a west-facing window.[8]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 8 Version 3.jpg
    • Kitchen and bathroom windows are great for cacti, because they can pull additional moisture from the air as needed.[9]
  2. Water the cactus weekly during growing season. Overwatering can kill a cactus, but the plant will need weekly waterings during active growing periods. Growth phases are typically between spring and fall. When the soil feels dry to the touch, water the plant until the soil is thoroughly damp.[10]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 9 Version 3.jpg
    • Don’t water if the soil is still moist, as this will cause rot and kill the plant.[11]
  3. Fertilize the plant weekly during the growing season. Cacti will also benefit from regular feedings during the spring, summer, and fall months. When you go to water the cactus each week, stir in a balanced 10-10-10 fertilizer before watering. Dilute the fertilizer to a quarter of the strength as recommended by the label.[12]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 10 Version 3.jpg
  4. Provide plenty of circulation. Cacti don’t necessarily like drafts or stiff breezes, but they will thrive in areas where there’s plenty of fresh air.[13] You can improve the circulation in your home by running ceiling fans, opening vents, and opening windows during warmer weather.
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 11 Version 3.jpg
  5. Rotate the pot monthly. Like many plants, a cactus will grow toward the light, and this can cause uneven or distorted growth. Encourage balanced growth by providing the cactus with even light, and rotate the pot a quarter turn every month.[14]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 12 Version 3.jpg
  6. Repot the cactus annually. Pick a well-draining pot that’s one size larger than the current pot. Fill the pot with cactus potting mix. Pick up your cactus, place your hand around the base of the plant, and turn the pot over to remove the cactus. Gently tap the roots to remove old soil, and prune off any dead or dried roots. Place the cactus in the new pot and firm the soil around the base with your hands.
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 13.jpg
    • For the first two weeks after transplanting, don’t water the cactus, and keep it in a bright location that’s protected from direct sunlight.[15]
  7. Encourage the cactus to enter dormancy in winter. Fall and winter are typically dormant months for cacti. Dormancy is necessary for most plants to recoup their energy, and the rest period will encourage flower growth later on. You can help the plant enter dormancy by:[16]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 14.jpg
    • Cutting back watering to once a month
    • Stopping the regular feedings
    • Moving the cactus to a cooler window (ideally between

EditTroubleshooting Common Problems

  1. Move the cactus to a darker location if it’s getting bleached. Some cactus varieties do better with indirect sunlight. If your cactus is turning white, yellowing, or spots are turning orange, it likely means the plant is getting too much sun. Move the cactus to a window that gets less direct sun.[17]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 15.jpg
  2. Move the plant to a brighter location if it’s reaching or thinning. A cactus that isn’t getting enough light may start to grow toward the light, causing distorted or unbalanced growth. Another symptom is a thinning top. Move the cactus to a window that gets more direct sunlight.[18]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 16.jpg
    • To prevent scorching, move a cactus to a brighter location gradually, by moving it closer to the light over a period of a few days.
  3. Address common cactus pests. There are a few insects that can be problematic when you’re growing cacti, including mealy bugs, scale, and spider mites. To get rid of these pests, rinse or mist the cactus with water to wash away the pests. Insecticides are not often useful at treating these problems.[19]
    Grow Cactus Indoors Step 17.jpg
    • Mealy bugs can be identified by the fuzzy patches they create on the plants, scale looks like raised brown spots, and spider mites will create whitish webs.

EditWarnings

  • Wear gloves when handling cacti to protect yourself from the prickles.

EditRelated wikiHows

EditSources and Citations

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How to Fold Up a Pop Up Tent

Many people use pop up tents as quick, easy shelters but find folding up the tent to be an unexpected hassle. Storing the tent involves folding the poles together and then over each other. This collapses the tent into a circle that you can seal in a bag until you need it again. With a little knowledge of folding techniques, you can pack away your tent until the next time you need it.

EditSteps

EditFolding Large Tents

  1. Clean the tent before you begin folding. Most of the time, all you’ll need to do is shake out dirt, sand, and pine needles. While you can attempt this later, the debris can get stuck in the tent folds. Tip the tent to pour out the debris. Wipe down the tent with a little bit of powdered laundry detergent and a moist rag when you have time.[1]
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 1.jpg
    • Never pack away a damp tent, or else you’ll end up with mold!
  2. Fold the top two poles together. Stand beside the tent. The poles are the ridges on top of the tent to your left and right. Stretch out to grasp both sides and pull them together.[2]
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 2.jpg
  3. Fold the bottom two poles together. The bottom poles form the outer edges of the tent, which now stick out to your left and right. You’ll need to reach both of them. Fold one of the bottom poles up and over to the top poles. Do the same with the other bottom pole so you’re holding all four poles together.[3]
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 3.jpg
    • Leave the tent’s door open to let out the air.
  4. Stand the tent up on its side. The folded tent resembles a big taco. Continue holding onto the four poles as you flip the tent onto its side. Move it so the open side of the taco shape rests against the ground.
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 4.jpg
  5. Fold the top poles to your back hand. You’ll need to stretch out your hands again. As you hold the four poles together, reach out over the uppermost part of the tent. Grab the back of the taco shape and bring it down to your other hand. Wrestle the tent to the ground to flatten it.[4]
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 5.jpg
    • The poles are lightweight, so you won’t need more than a minimal amount of force to bring down the tent. The poles are also flexible, so they’re unlikely to break.
  6. Slide the tent halves together. If you folded the tent correctly, it’ll look like two side-by-side circles of fabric. Bring one over the other to make your tent easy to pack.
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 6.jpg
  7. Press and seal the tent in a bag. Pop ups are designed to spring back into the shape of a tent, so maintain a firm grip on the poles. You can press down on it with your hands and knees to remove any leftover air preventing it from laying flat. Then, slip the tent into its bag to pack it away for your next trip.
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 7.jpg

EditFolding a Beach Tent

  1. Shake out debris before folding the tent. Clean out the tent before you put it away. Tip it over and shake loose any trapped dirt or sand. You can then clean the tent with a little water and a hose or rag. If you don’t have time to tackle tough stains now, you can pack away the tent and do it at home.
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 8.jpg
    • A little bit of a powdered detergent helps when scrubbing off tough stains.
  2. Grab the sides of the tent. Stand facing the entrance of the tent. The closest tent pole is the one that goes from side to side over the entrance. Reach out and grab both sides of the tent. Leave the door open if it has a cover on it.[5]
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 9.jpg
    • Beach tents are typically smaller than regular tents and don’t have poles running across the tent’s width. You can also try this if you’re still having trouble folding any other tent.
  3. Fold the sides of the tent together. Pull one side of the tent towards the center, then push it flat against the ground. As you hold it down, bring the other side over on top of it. It should now be in an oval shape.[6]
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 10.jpg
  4. Turn the tent on its side and press it flat. Flip the tent over so it’s on its edge. Push down on the center of this edge. The tent change into a figure-8 shape as you flatten it. You can put one hand on the side of the tent to help guide it to the ground.[7]
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 11.jpg
  5. Fold the tent over on itself. Hold onto the tent! It’ll spring into shape if you let go. Pick up one side of the tent, then bring it over onto the other side. This collapses the tent into a circle. You can rest a knee on the tent as you do this to ensure you don’t lose your grip.[8]
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 12.jpg
    • The poles are very flexible, so don’t worry about them breaking.
  6. Pack up the tent. If the tent came with an elastic band, wrap that around it to hold it in place. Put the tent in its bag. Tuck in any poles sticking out, then zip up the bag until you’re ready to use the tent again.
    Fold Up a Pop Up Tent Step 13.jpg

EditTips

  • Every tent folds a little differently. Consult the instructions that came with the tent for more folding guidance
  • If you don’t have the instructions that came with the tent, search online for folding videos. All pop up tents use similar basic folds, so you can manage to fold up any tent with a little experimentation.

EditSources and Citations

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